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Posts tagged "lgbtq"

dykesanddykery:

Two teenage girls in a relationship were found with gunshot wounds to the head in a south Texas park, with one of them dying from her injuries, media reports say. Police were searching for their assailants.

Mollie Judith Olgin, 19, and Mary Christine Chapa, 18, were found in knee-deep grass in a nature area in Portland by a couple Saturday, said Portland Police Chief Randy Wright, who confirmed to msnbc.com details first reported by the Corpus Christi Caller Times.

Olgin, originally from Ingleside but recently living in Corpus Christi, died; Chapa, of Sinton, was rushed to a hospital where she had surgery and was in serious but stable condition on Sunday, local NBC affiliate kristv.com reported. Wright said Chapa was still in the hospital on Monday.

Read more

A follow-up to the last post, for those of you who’d like a news article to share with people you know.

(via bananapeppers)

dorothy-snarker:

What is most frustrating about this, besides the obvious inequality and homophobia, is that every gay person already has an internal monitor that she or he uses to regulate public behavior. It’s mostly subconscious, often just instinctual. But it has been ingrained in us from the moment we realized we were different. I call it the “Is It Worth It?” Meter. It’s that meter tells us how fully we can be ourselves and when it is worth the consequences. For the most part, the answer is always yes. Yes, it’s worth it to be out. Yes, it’s worth it to be public. Yes, it’s worth it to hold your girlfriend’s hand at the movie theater.

But then there are times when it simply is not worth it. No, it’s not worth it to tell the douchey coffee guy who always tries to hit on you because it will only make him hit on you harder, and with more lesbian jokes. No, it’s not worth it to keep holding your girlfriend’s hand when you’re walking home late at night and nearing a large group of unruly men.

So for every person out there who persists on thinking we’re just shoving our big gay agenda into their faces, trust me – we’ve thought about the consequences of what we’re doing a lot more than you ever have. And we do what we do because we’ve decided that it’s worth it – despite all the bullshit – to be who we are. Because to self-censor ourselves for other people’s so-called comfort isn’t doing the world any favors. In fact, it hurts the world to let this double standard exist that says one kind of love is more acceptable than another kind of love. We think long and hard and endlessly about many of the simple gestures that straight people just take for granted.

So each time gay people demand to be treated equal, cry foul against discrimination and simply dare to give the person we love a kiss before the plane takes off, we chip away at that double standard. We stake our claim on our own equality. We say, I have the right to do this. If that makes you uncomfortable world, well, that’s your fucking problem. It’s not excessive to be kiss someone you love, Southwest Airlines. And it is definitely worth it.

READ THE FULL POST HERE

(via zincfingers)

iyjl:

“On Tuesday September 27th we are collaborating with the Chicago LGBTQ Immigrant Rights Coalition to present a community forum on the intersection between immigrant rights and the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) communities. Using the event as an excuse, here is a short list of these intersections put together by the Association of Latino Men for Action’s LGBT Immigrant Rights Project coordinator and IYJL organizer Tania Unzueta. Find more info here, or watch the live broadcast.”

7 simple reasons why the LGBTQ community needs to care about immigrant rights:

#1. We are immigrants too: Of the 10.8 million people who live in the United States undocumented, many are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ). Some of these are LGBTQ youth who came with their families as minors and consider the U.S. their home, while others came to escape persecution in their own countries. They have built their lives here, fallen in love, and started families, but under current U.S. immigration law there is no legal process for them to become citizens. Today they remain in the country in limbo, vulnerable to abuse, and under constant threat of being deported.

#2. Our families have limited options: LGBTQ immigrants, both documented and undocumented, face hurdles when attempting to regularize their status or become citizens. If an immigrant with a visa happens to fall in love with a U.S. citizen of the same sex, their partner cannot help them change their immigration status to that of a permanent residentv. Because same-sex relationships are not recognized under the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA), for an immigrant who is in a same-sex marriage, there are an extra 2 years of residency before citizenship if the application is accepted compared to one who is in a heterosexual marriage. But if the application is denied, the immigrant partner will be put in deportation proceedings. There are at least 35,000 same-sex couples in the U.S. that are affected by the immigration system.

#3. We can’t help our immigrant partners: If a person is in deportation proceedings, whether it is because they traveled undocumented or were denied adjustment of status, there are very few options for them to remain in the country – heterosexual or LGBTQ. Some get a “cancelation of removal” from immigration when they have family members- children, husbands or wives, except that for same-sex couples, their citizen spouses do not count. As of May 2011 the policy of the Obama administration has explicitly been to deport immigrant same-sex partners of U.S. citizens, regardless of marital status. This year the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has estimated that they will deport over 400,000 people, the most annual deportations in the country’s history. According to statistics by DHS a third of immigrants detained have no criminal record, many of them include LGBTQ people, and permanent partners of U.S. citizens. [NOTE: This may change under the recent change in enforcement priorities announced by the Obama administration, and the guidelines for prosecutorial discretion announced by DHS. These procedures include LGBT people and same-sex couples, according to the White House, however there are still many questions about the implementation and efficacy of the policy].

#4. We are here escaping persecution: Many LGBTQ and HIV positive immigrants leave their country of birth escaping homophobic and transphobic violence, including threats to their lives. Since 1994 the U.S. considers this ground to request asylum and eventually permanent residency. However, the process for asylum can be a long and harsh process, where in the end, there is no guarantee that it will be granted. There are several cases of gay and transgender immigrants, who could not meet the burden of proof for their asylum claim. Some of them have accused immigration judges and officials of holding biased standards based on stereotypes of safety and behavior, and are still in limbo, or detained.

#5. We face harassment & death in detention: A civil complaint by the National Immigrant Justice Center against DHS details “sexual assault, denials of medical care, arbitrary confinement, and sever harassment and discrimination” against LGBTQ immigrants. The complaint is on behalf of 13 transgender and gay people who came to the U.S. to escape persecution in their won countries. In addition, there have been several documented cases where transgender immigrants have been denied access to hormones, and HIV+ detainees denied access to medication, resulting in a number of deaths and investigations into human rights abuses. These abuses reflect the wrongful treatment that thousands of immigrants face in detention facilities throughout the country, under a system that disproportionately affects LGBTQ immigrants.

#6. Queer undocumented youth are fierce: LGBTQ undocumented organizers have taken leadership roles in the national campaign for immigrant rights. This has been most visible in the campaign for the Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors Act (DREAM), which would provide a conditional path to citizenship for immigrant youth who arrived to the country before the age of 16. LGBTQ youth have “come out” to speak about being LGBTQ and undocumented, using their stories to advocate for change.xiv Additionally some of these youth make specific references to the gay liberation movement as inspiration, citing Harvey Milk’s activism in the 1980s. If these youth were to be deported, some would be going back go countries that they have never known, and that may not be accepting of their sexuality and gender. For many of these LGBTQ undocumented youth the only country they have known is the U.S. and they are fighting for their lives.

#7. Our struggles are intertwined: The same politicians and organizations that oppose the rights of undocumented immigrants oppose the rights of LGBTQ people. Data shows that we are more likely to encounter a person who favors both immigrant and LGBT rights, than someone who supports immigration, but opposes same-sex marriage. Homophobic politicians are likely to attempt to block immigration reform to prevent LGBTQ immigrants from gaining legal status through same-sex permanent partnerships. LGBTQ movements need to build strategic alliances with immigration movements to ensure equal rights for all.

(via queerdesi)

dykesanddykery:

vintagelesbian:

billyjane:

i12bent:Colette, French novelist who was as famous for her free (and therefore scandalous) life style as for her writing, died on Aug. 3, 1954…
Photo: Colette, 1925 - LIFE archives

dykesanddykery:

vintagelesbian:

billyjane:

i12bent:Colette, French novelist who was as famous for her free (and therefore scandalous) life style as for her writing, died on Aug. 3, 1954…

Photo: Colette, 1925 - LIFE archives

dykesanddykery:

A black and white photo of Frida Kahlo standing outside surrounded by small dogs.

Frida Kahlo and Her Dogs by Gisèle Freund, 1948

Both subject and photographer are eligible to be featured here.

waytogojeremy:

saltmarshhag:

girlsarestrong:

hernameishelen:

Sorry, but I don’t know what a triangle is. Unless you mean three lines between three points with angles always measuring to 180 degrees. The fact someone made a triangle to represent the whole of sexuality, including the gray-scale way back in 2002 … well, damn. I’m sorry it was used in reference to sexuality when someone a shit load of time before us had done so.

I didn’t know the nazis used triangles to mark different prisoners until you people told me. They didn’t cover that in school. Before that, it was just a fucking triangle.

This whole triangle = appropriation shit is grasping at straws. Appropriation means an intent to take on, and ours is just a triangle. I don’t want to be gay, I don’t want to be like gay people, I want to be me, and that’s asexual, that’s it, that’s all. I don’t want to appropriate any shit from any sexuality, or any group of people - I want to be asexual.

There are valid criticisms of the ace community, like asexual elitism, and anti-sex attitudes. But a bleeding triangle that I’m guessing most people didn’t make the connection from gay prisoners in the Nazi camps to asexuals is not one of them.

Next, we’re not going to be allowed to use purple because they had purple triangles, too, though it does escape me the denomination that was used for. Symbols are symbols are symbols, and just because the Nazis used the swastika doesn’t mean anyone else who uses the swatiska as their symbolism is a Nazi, or trying to be a Nazi. Same or similar symbols are used across cultures, and it’s not appropriation. Stop grasping at straws.

The swastika was appropriated BY the Nazis from Jainism, Buddhism and Hinduism. Comparing the triangle to the swastika does NOT work, as the triangle badge system was invented by the nazis to identify IN THE CAMPS the groups they were murdering- and subsequently RECLAIMED by some of these groups, notably the pink triangle with gay men.

The pink triangle has been reclaimed as a symbol of gay pride and in holocaust REMEMBERANCE. The black triangle has been reclaimed by some in the disability rights movement, lesbians and feminists for similar reasons, as it was mainly used to designate mentally ill and disabled people, as well as ‘undesirables’ such as lesbians and prostitutes. I find it EXTREMELY hard to believe that the triangle was used by AVEN in a pure coincidence considering the history and visibilty of the triangle symbol and the LGBT rights movement. The fact that you ‘didn’t know’ and it was before your time does not make it not appropriation, nor does it make it acceptable.

I most definitely make the connection between the triangle and the holocaust, when I see it:  as do many people who have learned about the horrors of the holocaust. Particularly if they are from one of the groups that were being purged.

ETA: If you’re going to argue with queer people about our symbols and our history, learning about our history, including queers in the holocaust might be a good jumping off point. Also, THIS IS WHAT HAPPENS WHEN SCHOOLS DON’T TALK ABOUT THE HOLOCAUST.

is this real life

holy fucking shit

I think it’s a mistake to blame this all on the education system, as much as I like to blame the education system for things.  I think it makes more sense to blame it on individual people’s flaws, as well as the particular kind of echo chamber and anti-educating-yourself ideology that you see on the internet sometimes.  Specifically (and bluntly) I think it’s that internet ”aces” tend to be teenage shut-ins: their ideas are dreamed up and passed around by people who don’t interact enough with other people IRL and who are too young to have enough life experience to base ideas on. 

I bet none of us learned about the pink triangle during school. I bet very, very few of us had teachers that explicitly taught us about gay liberation, the oppression of glbt people and the history of gay liberation symbolism.  It’s different for every person but, here’s how I learned about these things:  from books (from libraries and used bookstore jobs), from zines, from friends who passed around other books and zines, from various gatherings like Southern Girls, Camp Trans or just random punk shows or random film screenings.  And from internet message boards too. I’m not hating on the internet.

I was able to learn the roots of things, not just their most watered-down applications (ex.:  The White Privilege Checklist). I was able to learn about the history of movements and feel empowered by being connected to that history, ( to absurd, self-aggrandizing extreme, like my punk-ass was somehow the decedent of the Spanish Anti-Fascist Brigades or the Wobbles).

The “asexual movement” seems like an extreme example of what happens when young people become interested in liberation movements, but, for some reason, don’t bother to learn about the context or the history or to talk to people who aren’t other teenagers about them.  Instead the liberation rhetoric turns into this way to assert this adolescent narcissism, where every minuscule difference between myself and other people is an axis of oppression.  

And like other people have said, it’s not just annoying, it’s a big fucking problem, because it’s hurting queer kids.

Now instead of having a support network for discovering what queer people have experienced before them; all the ways we have internalized homophobia affecting our identities and our desires; they are getting hit with this subculture that enables their internalized homophobia in the most disgusting way.  ”No, no, you don’t like men but find the idea of sex with a woman horrifying? That means you are asexual! It is okay to feel that way forever”, “You love your best friend but in a platonic way? That’s great! You’re not repressing anything”.  What scary messages for young queer people to be getting!  Especially if they are going along with a message that any queer person who reaches out to them is a “sexual” and an oppressor. 

(via galesofnovember)

saltmarshhag:

tlgbpolicewatch:

What could be more hateful than burning the memorial to a recently deceased transgender woman? How many more girls must die, or be assaulted or raped before the MPD admits that there is an epidemic of anti-trans* violence occuring in this city? How many more of their officers need to assault, beat, shoot, or harass transwomen before Chief Lanier, Mayor Gray and the City Council admit there exists widespread bigotry and discrimination within the Metropolitan Police and take real, measurable steps to combat it? How many more violent drunks will be reinstated to their jobs so they can fire upon the citizens of this city? And how long will America stand for this embarassment in our nation’s capitol?

We are a group of activists that formed in response to hate crimes, trans profiling and biased policing in Washington, DC.  Here we hope to further our network, spread awareness and facilitate communication with community members and concerned individuals.

(via saltmarshhag-deactivated2013011)

pinkpenguin22:

saltmarshhag:

Hold the fuck up. What is this revisionist history crap?

It wasn’t that long ago that the word “queer” started being reclaimed in the first place. Trans people were just as likely, in many cases more likely, to get called homophobic slurs such as queer as anyone else. I’ve been called a queer more times in threatening/harassing situations than I’ve been called a “tranny.” And that’s what you obnoxious little shits are deliberately refusing to understand. Queer was imposed. It wasn’t a fun exciting umbrella we just all decided to get under spontaneously. It is a violent word that was taken back as an act of violence against our oppressors.

Stop using cis LG transphobia to justify het cis asexuals “reclaiming” a slur that they aren’t targeted with, for fuck’s sake. First of all, a lot of us are trans and queer. And even while marginalized under LGBT coalitions, trans people have always been a part of queer communities, going back over 100 years to the days when we were all “uranians” and “inverts,” before “homophile/homosexual” and “transvestite” were even differentiated by the sexology/medical establishment. Our cultures are inseparable, no matter how much transphobic cis LGBs and a handful of homophobic transsexual people try.

I don’t think you couldn’t come up with a more inappropriate comparison, to be honest. But hey, who gives a fuck about actual queer history?

It’s not like I actually study queer history or anything *rolls eyes*

In other news…

I’m thinking of all the ways one could revise this statement so that it actually makes sense

I actually study queer history so that I am better able to maliciously ignore facts that make me look like an ignorant bigot

I actually study queer history so that I can act as if I know more about trans history and trans life than actual trans people

I actually study queer history so I can continue to mine it for neato keen things to appropriate, discarding anything that would challenge me in any substantial way

I actually study queer history so that I can imply my fancy book learnings mean more than other people’s lived experiences

I actually don’t study queer history, I read a few facts that have been revised by straight people to benefit them and use these as a weapon against actual queers in my neverending quest to further marginalize them by invading their spaces and stealing their culture and portraying them as the bullies, the monsters, the bigots, the historical revisionists, because I’m just another homophobic tool who thinks I have a right to anything neat and shiny, even if it’s shiny with other people’s blood


Also my presumably ~snarky~ asexual pic isn’t loading, but it was probably too busy watching Dr. Who and crying about its best friend’s new boyfriend privilege


lindentea:

saltmarshhag:

pinkpenguin22:

strudelcuddy:

pinkpenguin22:

So let me get this straight.  A person who doesn’t struggle cannot identify as queer?

If your struggle is unrelated to being attracted to the same sex or being trans, then no, you can’t identify as queer.

If your struggle revolves around being cis and only having/desiring opposite sex partners, you are straight

I was going to stop talking to stupid people but I want to point something out.

It wasn’t very long ago when trans people weren’t considered queer either.  So if you still want to go on the whole definitions thing, labels are flexible with time.  And…I’m out, enjoy your drama

Hold the fuck up. What is this revisionist history crap?

It wasn’t that long ago that the word “queer” started being reclaimed in the first place. Trans people were just as likely, in many cases more likely, to get called homophobic slurs such as queer as anyone else. I’ve been called a queer more times in threatening/harassing situations than I’ve been called a “tranny.” And that’s what you obnoxious little shits are deliberately refusing to understand. Queer was imposed. It wasn’t a fun exciting umbrella we just all decided to get under spontaneously. It is a violent word that was taken back as an act of violence against our oppressors.

Stop using cis LG transphobia to justify het cis asexuals “reclaiming” a slur that they aren’t targeted with, for fuck’s sake. First of all, a lot of us are trans and queer. And even while marginalized under LGBT coalitions, trans people have always been a part of queer communities, going back over 100 years to the days when we were all “uranians” and “inverts,” before “homophile/homosexual” and “transvestite” were even differentiated by the sexology/medical establishment. Our cultures are inseparable, no matter how much transphobic cis LGBs and a handful of homophobic transsexual people try.

I don’t think you couldn’t come up with a more inappropriate comparison, to be honest. But hey, who gives a fuck about actual queer history?

Wait, seriously?

“It wasn’t very long ago when trans people weren’t considered queer either.”


Oh. Oh hell no.

Do yourself a favor and go read about the Stonewall and Compton’s Cafeteria riots. You’ll notice that the earlier you get into LGBTQ history, the more inextricable trans people are from cis LGB people. Actually, I think trans people (except for the privileged HBS crowd) being able to assert that they are straight is a more recent development than vice versa.

I mean, did you believe the revisionist tripe and think Stonewall was a friendly protest instigated by a bunch of white cis gay men or have you just never read much (non-revisionist) queer history?

Also, like saltmarshhag, I can say that I’m far more likely to be on the receiving end of homophobic slurs than transphobic slurs.

(via qweerdo)